Pre-Thesis- Week8

Step 1 – Collaborative mash-up

A). Tao’s project is about providing a private traveling plan for customers. I actually did similar projects previously. For his projects I recomended him to think more about the client database, and trying to a unique way to analyze their differnt characteristic and identify the distinctions between different types of  client, then prepare differnt UI experience for them.

Useful papers:

1. paper 1

2. paper 2

3. paper 3

Relevant Projects:

1. project 1

2. Project 2

B). With your partner, come up with a design for an experiment, visual artefact, or prototype that you are both interested in.

We are inspired by another project about teaching autistic children how to communicate.

Use the similar strategy on the target client.

Represent our client’s good memories.

Strategy : set the compairation groups.

Intervention 1: Participants were randomized to receive treatment (n = 5) or to the wait-list control group (n = 5). The treatment group received IRT in 3 sessions; controls received no additional intervention, but continued any ongoing treatment.

IRT Content:

(1) select a disturbing dream, preferably one of lesser intensity (with a less threatening nightmare, people usually find it easier to imagine and rehearse a changed version);

(2) change this nightmare any way you wish;

(3) rehearse this new dream a few minutes each day (twice can suffice) at a time of your choosing; and

(4) continue these instructions every day, and consider working with a different nightmare every 3 to 7 days as needed. It is also vital to remind clients that they are to rehearse the new dream only, and not the nightmare.

Intervention 2:

Set 2 group of traveling teams, for one group let the users to write down every day ‘s best memory or bad memory can be improved,

 

Step 2:

Nightmares are extremely dysphoric dreams involving threats to an individual’s emotional or physical sense of safety or threats to or loss of loved ones. They are common in children, adolescents, and adults. Approximately 5% to 8% of the general adult population reports having nightmares once per week or more often, and lifetime prevalence for nightmares is practically 100%. To be considered a “disorder,” nightmares need to cause significant daytime suffering and distress, while the term “chronic nightmares” is typically used when nightmares persist for at least six months with a frequency of one or more nightmares per week.

Many factors can cause the nightmares. Early traumatic experiences, life stressors, such as moving to a new city, divorce, financial worries, starting a new job, and genetics can all play a role. In some people, nightmares can be related to their personalities, for example, people who are particularly sensitive or highly creative or artistic are among those who may be more prone to nightmares. Or nightmares can be triggered by medications, including some antidepressants, barbiturates, and beta blockers.

In the past few decades, a new view has emerged in dream science. A wealth of clinical studies have shown that simple and highly effective treatments for nightmares exist.

Current best practice guides for the treatment of nightmares consistently recommend imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT) as the treatment of choice. IRT is a cognitive imagery intervention that teaches patients to change their remembered nightmares and to rehearse new scenarios. This approach has been successfully used in both children and adults, and in veterans, trauma victims, people living through major stressors or life crises, and patients suffering from serious mental illness, such as depression.

The key instructions for IRT typically include the following steps: (1) select a disturbing dream, preferably one of lesser intensity (with a less threatening nightmare, people usually find it easier to imagine and rehearse a changed version); (2) change this nightmare any way you wish; (3) rehearse this new dream a few minutes each day (twice can suffice) at a time of your choosing; and (4) continue these instructions every day, and consider working with a different nightmare every 3 to 7 days as needed. It is also vital to remind clients that they are to rehearse the new dream only, and not the nightmare. The treatment is relatively straightforward and highly effective, and adverse effects are rarely encountered.

Addressing nightmares can be all the more important because their negative aspects can go well beyond the distressing experiences they present in and of themselves. Increased frequency of nightmares is correlated with severe sleep disturbances, including higher rates of insomnia; increased severity of psychological and psychiatric distress; suicidal ideation; and poor physical health. By directly targeting nightmares, people can experience significant improvements not only in nightmare frequency, but also in these other spheres.

How to enhance the IRT result and let more and more people to pay attention on cure the nightmare is really important for this project.

2.Thesis statement: 

By creating a virtual dream world to rehearsal the healing dream content for insomnia and trauma victims (PTSD) patients can enhance the result of imagery rehearsal therapy to reduce their nightmare frequency and heal a shattered worldview.

Step 3 – Continue talking to people

Talk to people :

1. Jayeeta Basu, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology

Research Keywords

molecular, cellular, & translational neurosciencec, systems, cognitive, & computational neuroscience

Email: jayeeta.basu@nyulangone.org

Phone: 646-501-4559

2. NYU BASU LAB

3. Trauma victims Group: NYC WELL: Call 888-NYC-WELL (888-692-9355)
Text WELL to 65173

4. NYU Sleep Disorder Group: Nishay Chitkara,MD, Specialties: Critical Care, Pulmonary Medicine, Language: English, Phone: 212-598-6422

 

email jayeetaemail trauma survivors

Step 4 – Early prototype for playtesting

In this stage, I prototyped several ways help different patients to represent and record their nightmare experiences, and let them to list severl ways that can improve their sleep.

Design Setting: 10 Adult PTSD Patients

Intervention: Participants were randomized to receive treatment (n = 5) or to the wait-list control group (n = 5). The treatment group received IRT in 3 sessions; controls received no additional intervention, but continued any ongoing treatment.

IRT Content:

(1) select a disturbing dream, preferably one of lesser intensity (with a less threatening nightmare, people usually find it easier to imagine and rehearse a changed version);

(2) change this nightmare any way you wish;

(3) rehearse this new dream a few minutes each day (twice can suffice) at a time of your choosing; and

(4) continue these instructions every day, and consider working with a different nightmare every 3 to 7 days as needed. It is also vital to remind clients that they are to rehearse the new dream only, and not the nightmare.

Main Outcome Measures Scores on the Nightmare Frequency Questionnaire (NFQ), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), PTSD Symptom Scale (PSS), and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) at 3- and 6-month follow-up.

Step 5 – Keep up with the research

Which parts of the brain specialize in activities such as seeing or planning or feeling emotions?

Why dreams tend to be negative?

how to have partial control of dreams, to temper their negativity when necessary (such as in nightmares), or simply to enhance dream experience?

How to determine if treating chronic nightmares with imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT) reduces the frequency of disturbing dreams, improves sleep quality, and decreases PTSD symptom severity?

How to enhance the result of imagery rehearsal therapy ?

 

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